Resilient Ways: Imagine a free world …

Education and Learning

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Back to index … “It is paradoxical, yet true, to say, that the more we know, the more ignorant we become in the absolute sense, for it is only through enlightenment that we become conscious of our limitations. Precisely one of the most gratifying results of intellectual evolution is the continuous opening up of new and greater prospects.” ~ Nikola Tesla Much if not all of the success of a community is linked to its ability to learn, to store and index knowledge from others, derive new sources of information, and to maintain necessary roles. But does this imply public

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Health & Wellness

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Back to index … “Early to bed and early to rise, Makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.” ~ Ben Franklin, Poor Richard’s Almanac People want to live long, healthy lives. People do not want their lives suddenly cut short by injury nor by illness, and they want to be healthy, vibrant, and capable their entire life. We believe in an integrated approach to the whole human, including all aspects of health. People have physical bodies, but they are clearly more than their physical bodies because we know that when a body is no longer living, it is not what

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Waste Reduction, Sanitation, and Garbage

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Back to index … “When they had all had enough to eat, he said to his disciples, ‘Gather the pieces that are left over. Let nothing be wasted.’ “ ~ John 6:12 This is, in several ways, the “nastiest” topic – not simply because it deals with one of the uglier facts of life, but also it is one of the common ways in which communities of all sizes fail: how do we manage human sewage, waste, garbage? Firstly, in keeping with the anarchist tenor of this, we should recognize that this is also not a “one size fits all”

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Shelters

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Back to index … “Sinner man, where you gonna run to? All on that day.” ~ Nina Simone There are a great many ways to have shelter from weather and privacy from other people. There are natural shelters of all kinds, such as caves, overhangs, spaces that may be excavated from the ground, living directly on the ground or in tents, and living in elevated places such as tree houses. Essentially every imaginable material has been used for making shelter of one kind or another, and buildings have been known to last a few hours, a few days, a few

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Food

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Back to index … “Lastly, the eighth and the most meritorious of all, is to anticipate charity by preventing poverty, namely, to assist the reduced brother, either by a considerable gift or loan of money, or by teaching him a trade, or by putting him in the way of business, so that he may earn an honest livelihood and not be forced to the dreadful alternative of holding up his hand for charity.” ~Maimonides, circa AD 1170 Food is critical. Food is often overlooked in America’s post-modern culture, because, well, it seems to “simply arrive”. The fact that Americans assume

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Water

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Back to index … “Water, water, every where, And all the boards did shrink; Water, water, every where, Nor any drop to drink.” ~ Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Rime of the Ancient Mariner, 1834 We are currently (as of this writing – August 2017) scouting for small and medium scale plots of land to support anarchist (Heathian) communities – and our intention is to focus on those that contain their own natural sources of water (spring and aquifer). Some larger parcel sizes – 50 acres or greater – might have spring fed ponds or even streams. When it comes to natural

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Power Generation

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Back to index … “If you want to find the secrets of the universe, think in terms of energy, frequency and vibration.” ~ Nikola Tesla Power for electricity, for heating, is critical – but poorly understood. Americans use a lot of electricity, and it is impossible to say how efficiently, since this is based on market forces and subjective choice. What we can say is that every kind of community envisioned will need to have access to some kind of power – unless the community is being deliberately designed around primitivism or low-tech living. Typical uses for power include, but

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Moral Framework and the Zero Aggression Principle

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Back to index … “A libertarian is a person who believes that no one has the right, under any circumstances, to initiate force against another human being for any reason whatever; nor will a libertarian advocate the initiation of force, or delegate it to anyone else. Those who act consistently with this principle are libertarians, whether they realize it or not. Those who fail to act consistently with it are not libertarians, regardless of what they may claim.” ~ L. Neil Smith, 1996 In order to form lasting communities where people live free, we believe there is an important moral

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Size Matters: How Many Acres?

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Back to index … “Quantity has a quality all its own.” ~ often attributed to Stalin, 1945 A fundamental consideration is always cost. More acres typically cost more money to acquire or more money to develop into useful space for living, working, and enjoying life. Generally speaking, having more land is better, location is always critical to economic success, and if one community is good, several communities are better. One of our goals is to avoid pigeonholing – restricting ourselves to some particular strategy based upon preconceived notions of what makes an “optimal living arrangement.” In addition to determining the

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Rural vs Urban

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Back to index … “These peasants carry their honour in their hands so that they may constantly consult it; this same honour that once was felt so much at home in the city but now has taken refuge in a more rural setting.” ~ Tirso de Molina, 1630, “Burlador de Sevilla” Our goal in designing a small number of rural communities is not to ignore cities, nor to deprecate their ability to have within them effective and even resilient communities, but to start somewhere. Among our motivations for beginning in rural areas are: Land is cheaper. Rules are fewer. Large tracts of

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